525,600 Minutes

It’s hard to believe it has been one full year since I graduated University! So much has happened in that time. Many amazing things, some hard things. Leaving Canada, travelling, exploring Europe, falling in love with Dublin. So much musical creation, digging in to the music scene here. Seeing with my own eyes what the musical life entails. A Diploma in Songwriting from BIMM Dublin. An EP on the way. Gaining respect for those who spend their lives in the service industry. Leaving that industry to focus on myself and my art, and gaining even more respect for self-employed entrepreneurs, especially artist. Manifesting a wild summer ahead. A Charity Gig & Single. Lots of Guinness. And finally, Its been full of making new connections, as well as nurturing old ones.
It was my first year really being on my own in The Real World, without answering to an institution, without family around. There have, of course, been challenges along the way. All I had was myself, and I really had to trust myself. I learned a lot about what I might want from this crazy, wonderful life. Truth be told, I still really have no idea but I can’t say I’m in a rush to figure it out.
I think it important to look back on the road behind. After all, its the only road we know. The path ahead tends to be much less clear, and much harder to trust. But we can trust the one behind, the moments of joy we experienced, and this can fill us with hope that the one ahead will be just as beautiful, the sunsets even brighter.
Those who know me know that I live on an undying quest for freedom. But freedom can be found in every moment. Freedom can especially be found in gratitude. I think I’m too quick to get down on myself. I need to take pride in the things I’ve accomplished in a year, of the risks I’ve taken, and for doing it all on my own.
I could be absolutely anywhere one year from now, and that fills me with excitement. Looking forward to the summer ahead!

October

I had the chance to explore more of Ireland this month, and even better, with a good friend from University. We went all the way across the Island, to the Cliffs of Moher, and then made our way back through little villages and along the stunning Irish coast, sprinkled with trappings of granite, thousands of miles of penny walls, and grazing cattle.

October 8: Streets as Stage


Yesterday I had the pleasure of playing at Dublin’s annual Busker Fleadh. It was a really cool festival, beanbag chairs and a wide variety of street acts. While I was playing I was thinking about busking as an art, and quite an ancient one at that. From Socrates to Jesus to Ed Sheeran, people have always used the street as a stage. That’s why I believe that the streets should be kept public, for poets and preachers alike, to share what they feel they need to with the world. Boycott busking permits, they kill art. The street serves as a dynamic stage, with the performer using the environment around them for props and sets. Your audience is constantly changing, they come in waves, they stay they go they ebb they flow. If you can get even one to pause, it’s almost certain that more will gather. Free entertainment for the world, for the street, and it’s strange that nothing feels better than feeling deserving of someone’s pocket change. I love the streets of Dublin. As much as I miss Hamilton’s quiet curves and bends, it’s subtle charm, I can’t get enough of strolling Dublin streets at the moment. They make for quite the stage. Everywhere you go, the voices of singers and songwriters bounce off tall stoic brick building faces, flow down cobblestones and in front of shops.
As I was playing I was thinking of the Shakespeare poem “all the world is a stage” and rewrote it in my head:
Every street is a stage,
And all the men and women merely buskers,
They enter and exit, sometimes with instruments, sometimes with friends, sometimes on their own,
And one busker in his time plays many parts,
A performer, an observer, a kind stranger, a distracted passerby,
Every street is stage.